Spindle Revisited

The fruits of the Spindle tree are hanging around and although I try to ignore them they are just too vibrant to pass by. Anyway we have had Sloes and Hawthorn on here loads of times, so why not more Spindle berries?

This tree caught my eye because it still had lots of green leaves on it (I will show you in a minute) and I thought that I could do a post on how to identify Spindle.

It will be a short post.

Spindle

Spindle

SpindleI don’t mean how to identify it when it is covered in pink and orange berries…. I was thinking more about identifying it in Winter.

Spindle

SpindleIt is still going to be a short post. Spindle has very distinctive bark.

SpindleSo here are some photographs that I took in March of this year when the leaves were just starting to appear.

There isn’t anything else in the hedgerow that looks quite like this.

Spindle

SpindleThese are young shoots the older wood loses some of the distinctive ribbing and green colour but it will still be evident on parts of the tree.

SpindleThe leaves, when they start to open, are quite distinctive in themselves but green stripy bark is a dead give away.

Spindle

SpindleAlthough I could find these trees quite easily in the winter and early spring as soon as the hedgerow started to grow I lost them again. It wasn’t until the fruits appeared in the autumn that they came back. Now I have a much clearer picture of their locations and plan to photograph them throughout the summer next year.

So that is the “Identification in Winter” bit done, that was just an excuse really to post more pictures of berries.

Berries and green leaves.

Spindle

Spindle

Spindle

Spindle

Spindle

Spindle

Spindle

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26 thoughts on “Spindle Revisited”

  1. I can never have too much spindle! I did the same as you have done and noted where I saw the berries and then went back the next spring. The flowers are so small and green that they are easy to miss, especially when a lot of the other hedgerow plants are so showy.

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    1. Thank you Pamela, that is lovely 🙂 But there is something fishy about the “Bagels and Lox” ending. The Badger has the keenest nose of all those animals and would obviously be very aware of personal hygiene. The Bird has virtually no sense of smell. However the Badger does have scent glands in his feet to enable him to retrace his steps each night and the Fox would know this. I think that the Fox got at the bird. The Fox is really the smelliest one of them 🙂

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    1. Thank you Crystal 🙂 It is very bright. There are so many red berries about, I usually find Spindle trees when I notice a particularly bright Hawthorn and go in for a closer look.

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    1. Thank you Jo 🙂 I have been working my way through your series on British trees and enjoying it very much. You might struggle to find Spindle though, very common in the South of England it starts to thin out around the Midlands and is almost absent from Scotland.

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      1. That’s a shame about the spindle! But that explains why I’m not familiar with it! 🙂 Thank you, I’m glad you’re enjoying my posts about trees. I love finding out about them myself, too!

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