Tag Archives: Beetle

Stenocorus meridianus Monster Bug!

This animal is ginormous. Okay it is about an inch long not counting the legs and antennae but it is still the biggest beetle that I am going to see today. (An inch is pretty big for a beetle, you wouldn’t get this in a matchbox) It’s a monster.

Variable Longhorn BeetleThis is an animal called the Variable Longhorn Beetle. It is called Variable because there is a lot of colour variation mostly from brown to black in different degrees. This one is a female. There is a colour difference between the sexes, the prothorax is black in the female and brown in the male.

Prothorax – The first segment of the thorax (the first bit behind the head)

Anyway don’t ask me to get you a male. They are supposed to be quite common but this is only the second one that I have ever seen. Flight time is May/June and just about over so this was a lucky spot. Variable Longhorn Beetle

Variable Longhorn Beetle

Variable Longhorn Beetle

Variable Longhorn Beetle

Variable Longhorn BeetleIt would make a very nice snack for a Blackbird. You could feed your family with one of these. 🙂

 

The Swollen-thighed Beetle

Oedemera nobilis. I don’t know how it came by the ridiculous name of “Swollen-thighed Beetle” I would have called it the “Swept-elytra Beetle” or something more descriptive. The female hasn’t got swollen thighs.

Male Swollen-thighed Beetle

Male Swollen-thighed Beetle

Male Swollen-thighed Beetle

Male Swollen-thighed Beetle

Male Swollen-thighed BeetleSo that is the male Swollen-thighed Beetle. That was nearly two weeks ago and since then I have been searching for a female. In the end I had to invent Spear Thistles just to get her attention.

And it is the elytra and not the thighs that identify this animal, the open and pointed wing cases. Technically she should be green but this one is getting on a bit (Just like me, she used to be green)

Female Swollen-thighed Beetle

Female Swollen-thighed Beetle

Female Swollen-thighed Beetle

Female Swollen-thighed Beetle

Female Swollen-thighed BeetleSo these are about now. Keep your eyes open for a little green beetle and if it has got open and pointed elytra then you will know that it is a Swollen-thighed Beetle.

Beautiful Redhead

This is a post about the Red–headed Cardinal Beetle, a black beetle with a red head. Apparently this beetle is often confused with the Lily Beetle (Black head) and the Black-headed Cardinal Beetle (Black head) so a key identification feature to look for in the Red-headed Cardinal Beetle is a red head.

Red-headed Cardinal BeetleI took these pictures a few days ago and I was holding out for a few more before I posted them but since then it has rained steadily every day.

You should be able to find them easily if you live in the UK. They like to sunbathe on leaves in the hedgerow or woodland edge and they are easy to spot, large and red, the phrase “like a sore thumb” comes to mind. But a sunny day would be best.

They are fun and they want to be photographed.

Red-headed Cardinal Beetle Red-headed Cardinal Beetle Red-headed Cardinal BeetleThey like to tease. When they are thinking about flying they open their elytra very, very slowly.

Red-headed Cardinal Beetle Red-headed Cardinal Beetle Giving you plenty of time to line up the shot.Red-headed Cardinal Beetle(The elytra are hardened fore wings, beetles have four wings like most insects but the front pair harden into wing cases)

When they do fly they don’t go very far, often just to the next leaf.

Red-headed Cardinal Beetle Red-headed Cardinal Beetle Red-headed Cardinal Beetle 11I get so frustrated when a beetle just stands there and won’t move.

“Go on then, take lots of pictures. I’m interesting.”

Red-headed Cardinal BeetleSo I love this little fellow.

Red-headed Cardinal BeetleRed-headed Cardinal Beetle, Pyrochroa serraticornis. A large red beetle with black legs and black toothed antennae it also has a red head. It is a predator catching other insects as they fly past. It is quite poorly camouflaged and I am guessing that it’s colour is intended as a warning to birds that it probably tastes bad or is poisonous. It flies from early May until the end of July.

Pyrochroa serraticornis

Nothing you can sing that can’t be sung

They are Weevils.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7They are Weevils called Liophloeus tessulatus.

They don’t have a common name. I always think that it is sad when an insect doesn’t have a common name, it means that they have never made an impact and nobody has really noticed them. There is no folk lore. No villagers ever walked down a country lane commenting, “There’s a lot of those little Smut Bugs about this year,” “Yes, they say that plenty of Smut Bugs mean we are in for a good harvest.”

Oh well.