Conkers

This is a post about a Horse Chestnut Tree and things that fall off it and there is a reason for this post.

Horse ChestnutI was having trouble getting inspired today.

I took Fizz up to the Badger cam and collected another card, put some more bait down. There were some lovely videos of the animals, I am very fond of wild animals but I didn’t really want to do another Badger post just yet. A Pheasant spent two hours in front of my camera (at first I was a bit peeved but as I watched the videos I started to like him, we might yet have pheasant for supper). There has been a development. The farmer who rents the fields has put sheep in there. That could make leaving my camera in that spot untenable. Sheep could just trigger the camera constantly and the batteries will die before nightfall (We will have a hundred and twenty vids of sheep) but I have left it there today, maybe there will be some interaction between Badger/Fox/Sheep in the night, I love interaction.

Horse ChestnutI had three interesting interactions with Humans today. The first was with Margaret, Fizz’s owner. The local shops don’t sell balls for Fizz to play with and I have been struggling with supply. I decided to order her some from the internet. 50 used tennis balls Β£25. Now some dog owners don’t like their dogs to play with tennis balls. They used to use lead in the dye for them and they are pressurised with nitrogen (They don’t use lead any more and nitrogen is harmless and part of the air that we breathe), before I lumbered myself with fifty tennis balls I just thought that I should check that she didn’t mind Fizz playing with them. Margaret said that was fine and she would give me something toward them when she had some change and I told her not to worry about that.

When I got back from walking Fizz today there was an envelope for me with Β£25 and I dig it. It has nothing to do with money, she owns a farm, land and house and can easily afford it, I had already afforded it and didn’t expect anything in return. Margaret was just saying thank you. I get it. I accepted the gift graciously and felt the love.

Horse ChestnutI met a fellow sitting on a stool outside of a small terraced house. It was a beautiful sunny evening and he was looking intently at a book in his lap and he was singing. He had a wonderful rich voice but was singing quite quietly and so I stood and listened for a while. I wasn’t sure that he had noticed me but after a bit he looked up and smiled and said, “Hello, I am singing.”

Horse ChestnutFinally I met a fellow beside a busy road, picking stuff off trees. “Hello,” I said, “What are you doing?” He told me that his wife had sent him out to collect conkers. I showed him where there were some better trees. That was my inspiration. I spent some time looking at this tree before deciding to photograph it.

I think that it is a beautiful tree, you decide.

Horse Chestnut

Horse Chestnut

Horse Chestnut

Horse Chestnut

 

Horse Chestnut

Horse Chestnut

Horse Chestnut

Horse Chestnut

Horse Chestnut

Horse Chestnut

Horse ChestnutA lot of love passed by today and I got conkers.

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34 thoughts on “Conkers”

    1. Thanks Maureen πŸ™‚ I absolutely love the way that flowers, plants and trees permeate our childhood memories. Our first toys, Remember the little helicopters that fell from sycamores, conkers of course and sweet chestnuts. Hmmm… Sweet Chestnuts, I feel a post coming on πŸ™‚

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  1. When I was a girl everyone collected conkers. I still love them – beautiful smooth shiny jewels in velvet lined cases. Both my daughters love them and my husband too. Young people and children aren’t as interested in them these days and I see lots just lying under the trees. The muntjac deer like to eat them so they don’t go to waste!

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  2. As Spanishwoods said, they are across the pond: we have them here in Pennsylvania too, buckeyes. Not good when one falls off and hits you on the head. Thanks for taking us on walkabout with you so many days, it’s always a lovely trip.

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    1. Ha Ha πŸ˜€ I know exactly what you mean. I used to spend a lot of time sleeping in a Sweet Chestnut tree and listening to the large and heavy fruits fall around me, wondering where the next one would land. πŸ™‚

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    1. Thanks Gin, there were a lot of trees spoilt by the leaf miners around here, at first I thought that it was going to be all of them but many did escape. But the leaf miners arrive too late to do any real harm to the trees other than spoil their looks and the trees that were affected are now full of fruit. It is a real shame that the leaf miners even exist but maybe one day nature will sort it out πŸ™‚

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  3. What a lovely post–brought a smile to my face, especially those conkers, shiny as new shoes. Well I remember collecting them at my granny’s house in Co. Wicklow, Ireland and threading them with string to bring to school and play “conkers” with. Seem to remember you always ended up getting your knuckles smashed. Now, here in the Hudson Valley of New York it’s rare to see a chestnut, but our garden is a hard hat zone of falling black walnuts, and the squirrels–red and grey–are in ecstasy.

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  4. I love your telling. I feel as though I am walking through your day beside you. I have never heard of conkers. Do we have these trees in the US, perhaps known by another name? We used to climb chinaberry trees and have chinaberry wars.

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