Nymphs of the Woundwort Shield Bug.

Unlike the last bug, which was carved from sandstone by an ancient and now forgotten civilisation, these bugs are actually manufactured by a jeweller in Sheffield. They are made of platinum with red Β copper insets and tiny gemstones around the edges and they are exquisitely beautiful. (Quite expensive too)

Well that is what I have always believed. New evidence has emerged that seems to suggest that these bugs are capable of reproducing themselves, with no master craftsmen involved.

This is a Woundwort Shield Bug. (They are quite small and so only get to occupy the middle bit of the picture)

Woundwort Shieldbug

Woundwort Shieldbug

Woundwort Shield BugYou might remember that back in June they were getting up to hanky panky in the bushes. So much so that I was having to cover Fizz’s eyes when we went for walks.

3

3I had never seen anything like it. So what was the result of all of this monkey business?

Try and guess what these are.

Woundwort Shield Bug late instar nymphs

Woundwort Shield Bug late instar nymphsI have never seen these little animals before but there are certain clues as to what they might be. The plant that they are on is Woundwort. They are following a Woundwort Shield Bug around like little Ducklings and they are quacking.

Woundwort Shield Bug late instar nymphs

Woundwort Shield Bug late instar nymphs

Woundwort Shield Bug late instar nymphsI am pretty certain that these are the love children of the beautiful Woundwort Shield Bug otherwise known as late instar nymphs of Eysacoris venustissimus. (Actually I know that is the case because I am a naturalist)

Another one for the collection then. πŸ™‚

Woundwort Shield Bug late instar nymphs

Woundwort Shield Bug late instar nymphs

Woundwort Shield Bug late instar nymphs

Woundwort Shield Bug late instar nymphs

Woundwort Shield Bug late instar nymphs

Woundwort Shield Bug late instar nymphsInsects love their children too, you know.

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27 thoughts on “Nymphs of the Woundwort Shield Bug.”

  1. Another post that filled my core! What a beautiful thing…and yes! Indeed, insects love their children too!! Amazing photos too my friend! πŸ™‚

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  2. You know, I really loathe bugs (Look up Palmetto Bug sometime to see why; nothing like waking up at 3 am to one of those trundling up the bedcovers!), but you’ve done an awful lot the past few days to change my mind. These are just astonishingly lovely.

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    1. Thanks Virginia πŸ™‚ Next time you are in the UK look us up. Fizz has a guided tour business. I am not really a part of it but I have to go along to hold her lead. The little things are the start of it all.

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  3. In my (limited) experience it is quite difficult to identify nymphs and find good photographs so I rate this highly. There is an online database called iNaturalist and I suspect they would appreciate your photos being added.

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    1. Thanks Andrew πŸ™‚ I do contribute my photographs to a few such sites already and it is a bit time consuming but I am checking this one out. They are always free to download my stuff for themselves if they want it. As is anyone. I strongly believe in promoting the enjoyment of nature and as it is free to me it is also free to you.

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  4. I laughed so much while reading this! If only lessons at school had been like this I would have learnt so much so quickly. All the woundwort near here has been mown away so I don’t think I will be able to find these little gems.

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