Mugwort

Fortunately I took these picture yesterday (albeit in the rain) because it is really horrible out today.

Mugwort: It isn’t the most visual of flowers but it has to be on the blog for a number of reasons. For a start Mugwort is a brilliant name. It is in flower now and you may see it and also it is one of the very interesting ones.

MugwortAs a food it has long been used in Europe to flavour meat and in Germany it is an essential ingredient for the stuffing of the Christmas Goose. It was also the flavour of beer before Hops came along and it is widely eaten in Japan, China and Korea.

Another name for Mugwort is Sailor’s Tobacco. I have read that this came about because sailors would smoke it when they ran out of tobacco. Where did they find Mugwort out at sea? However the dried leaves can be smoked and are said to be mildly narcotic and to provide vivid and colourful dreams.

I shall certainly be drying Mugwort this year as I like herbs that I can gather from the wild and I could look into the veracity of these claims from a purely scientific viewpoint.

Mugwort

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MugwortIt has a history of use in herbal medicine and can be bought over the counter or on line. There are organisations keen to denounce it’s use as never having been scientifically proven but most herbalists swear by it. This is one to look up yourself if it interests you.

For me it’s main properties are the ability to prevent demonic possession and also to protect travellers from all kinds of evil. I hate evil.

It also prevents sore feet when put in your boots and provides wonderful dreams when placed under your pillow.

This really is a useful herb and I haven’t even begun to list all of it’s properties here. So it deserves a post of it’s own even if it is not the most beautiful flower that I know.

Mugwort

Mugwort

Mugwort

Mugwort

Mugwort

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21 thoughts on “Mugwort”

  1. I read somewhere that tobacco in the early days was so expensive people used to smoke tiny amounts in tiny pipes – hence stories of leprachauns etc. Could be that as sailors were often broke, they couldn’t afford tobacco except when they just got paid. Esp as it was a stimulant, probably better for them at sea.

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    1. Thanks Debra πŸ™‚ Whilst the scientists argue about the medicinal properties of herbal remedies the ones that protect me from Witches, Goblins and Seven Headed Serpents all seem to work fine.

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      1. People may laugh but when their milk starts curdling and picnics get rained on …. will they know how to defend themselves? =)

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  2. I’ve never seen Mugwort or read about it before you posted this. I daresay it was a popular herb in Medieval times. I don’t think we have it in Australia, but there are so many non-idigenous plants first brought out by the English colonists in the late 1700s and early 1800s that it may be available in specialist herb plant nurseries today.

    I don’t believe the lecturer ever mentioned it when I was studying herbal medicine back in the early 1990s. The name is quite common in my own Herbals on my bookshelf though. Many of these are English.

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    1. Thanks Vicki πŸ™‚ Australia is a pretty unique place but I am surprised that colonists and or sailors didn’t bring Mugwort with them. It is well known in Asia as well as Europe and the Americas.

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  3. I’m sure Mugwort must be a character from Tolkein, or maybe even Dickens. Balthazar Mugwort. Boot restorer. And if you don’t like that idea, you can put it in your pipe and smoke it. (Evil grin. Whoops sorry. You don’t like evil.)

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